World AIDS Day, December 1

A red ribbon with hands over a world map

World AIDS day is organised every year to raise awareness of the challenges faced by people living with this disease, remember those who lost their lives and be aware that even in 2021, there are still 38 400 000 people living with HIV (https://aidsinfo.unaids.org/). Here is a selection of titles that can bring you to better understand the origins and issues faced by people living with AIDS. 

Origins

The origins of AIDS retraces the story of the emergence of this disease and explains the multiple factors that influenced its spread.

Stigmatisation

The particularity of AIDS is that it has been historically associated, by its mode of transmission, with stigmatized populations (homosexuals, drug addicts, etc). Viral Frictions: Global Health and the Persistence of HIV Stigma in Kenya explains how this stigma has been socially constructed and why it still persists even when treatments exist.

Access to treatment 

Even if treatments exist to treat AIDS, one of the raisons why it has not been eradicated is the unequal access to them. The Republic of Therapy: Triage and Sovereignty in West Africa’s Time of AIDS tells the story of the period between the discovery of  antiretrovirals  (1994) and the acknowledgement of the right to treatment by the health community. In this time, as the book explains, triage decisions were made to determine who would receive treatment or not which had important consequences on social relations.

Social movements

Let the record show: a political history of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993 and AIDS Drugs For All: Social Movements and Market Transformations describes how the social movement’s advocacy helped millions of people to have access to life-saving medication.

Many more titles are available under our dedicated call number: 614.547 AIDS. Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD)

Discover more books and films about AIDS on display in the entrance of the Library.


Illustration: World Aids Day, CC0 Mohamed Mahmoud Hassan

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